Navigation

» Biology / Courses


Biology Courses


BIO-499: Senior Research (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Senior research is a research and seminar course in which junior and senior level students conduct original laboratory, field, or library based research. Students are required to present their research orally and in written form. Prerequisite: BIO-299 or permission of instructor.


BIO-498: (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This is a research and seminar course in which junior or senior level students who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs conduct original laboratory, field, or library based research.  Students are required to present their research orally and in written form. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as expectations of the biology faculty. Prerequisite: BIO-299 or permission of instructor.


BIO-495: Health Issues Research Seminar (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A Pre-Health Post-Baccalaureate seminar course in which students will conduct literature research on current health issues facing society.  Students will present their findings in both an oral and written format. Prerequisite: enrolled in Pre-health Post-baccalaureate Certificate Program


BIO-461: Genetics Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Collection of laboratory exercises designed to provide practical exposure to some of the general principles considered in BIO-431. Laboratory work will be based upon a number of organisms including bacteria,  fungi, higher plants, fruit flies, and man. Three laboratory hours per week.  Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151. Corequisite: BIO-431.


BIO-456: Techniques in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (4 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course will cover the basic techniques used in molecular biology and biotechnology. The course has both lecture and laboratory components in which fundamental concepts and techniques will be presented and then practiced. The laboratory skill introduced in this class would be useful for students interested in pursuing graduate studies or employment in research laboratories, and those interested in environmental or health issues. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-251, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142.


BIO-446: Biochemistry I Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A collection of laboratory exercises designed to provide practical exposure to some of the general principles and methodology of biochemistry. Techniques include photometry, polarimetry, electrophoresis, centrifugation, and various chromatographic techniques. Also offered as CHE-446. Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151,
BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241. Corequisite: BIO/CHE-436.


BIO-438: Biochemistry II (3 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The second part of a 2-part course in Biochemistry, this advanced course is designed to prepare students for graduate study and careers in the fields of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. The course will present topics in modern Biochemistry including bio-molecular structure, enzyme catalysis, bioenergetics, biosynthesis of bio-molecules, and culminate with a discussion of special topics such as cellular signal transduction. Three lectures per week.
Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241, CHE-222/242, BIO/CHE-436, BIO/CHE-437.


BIO-437: Biochemistry I Recitation (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This is an upper-level seminar-style course that will focus on problem-solving, and analysis of primary literature in Biochemistry. The course will extend and reinforce the material covered in BIO/CHE-436. One meeting per week for 50 minutes. Corequisite BIO/CHE-436.


BIO-436: Biochemistry I (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of the chemistry of biological systems including metabolic interrelationships, reaction rates, control mechanisms, and integration of these reactions within the structural framework of the cell. Also offered as CHE-436. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241. Corequisite: BIO/CHE-437.


BIO-431: Genetics (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A course designed to provide an understanding of the principles of classical, population, and molecular genetics and the relationship of these principles to human heredity, agriculture, evolution, and selected environmental problems. BIO-461 is a corequisite for Biology majors. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.


BIO-421: Scanning Electron Microscopy (2 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The course is a comprehensive introduction to the theory and use of the techniques of scanning electron microscopy. The course is for students from a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to biology, chemistry, art, and human environmental science. Topics include history of SEM, electron optics (gun, lenses, probes, current), electron beam interactions (scattering and volume), image processing and optimization, critical point drying, and sputter coating. Designed as an instrumentation course it is necessary that students gain hands on knowledge of the SEM by completing a project. Each student will prepare a poster of her project results for presentation on the Celebrating Student Achievement Day. Three hours instruction per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, or BIO-105/145. Junior or Senior status required. Enrollment must be limited to 10 students.


BIO-399: Biology Seminar (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An upper level seminar course that focuses on one of the major modern biological themes. One seminar hour per week. Prerequisite courses: Completion of 16 hours in the sciences.


BIO-359: Terrestrial Field Studies (2 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course provides experience in the techniques required for research in the terrestrial environment.  Aspects of organism identification, community classification, soil study, and sampling techniques will be included.  One four-hour field meeting per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142, MAT-175 or  MAT-248.


BIO-358: Aquatic Field Studies (2 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course provides experience in the techniques required for research in the aquatic environment. Aspects of organism identification, habitat classification, water chemistry, and sampling techniques will be included.  One three-hour field meeting per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142, MAT-175 or MAT-248.


BIO-349: Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Students examine the functional organization and histology of the endocrine system, reproduction in the male and female; hormonal control of reproduction; functional organization and histology of the digestive system (including digestion, absorption and utilization), gas exchange, urinary system, and circulatory system; physiological recordings to include spirometry, respirometry, urinalysis, blood pressure, plethysmography, and electrocardiography; and, cat or sheep dissection of the heart and kidney. Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-338, BIO-348. Corequisite: BIO-339.


BIO-348: Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Students examine the functional anatomy of cells and tissues; the organization of the body; homeostasis; the integument; the skeletal system, histology and development of bone; micro anatomy and physiology of muscle; origin, insertion and actions of muscles, articulations and body movement; functional organization and histology of the nervous system and sensory structure including the integument, nose, tongue, ear and eye; light microscopy; physiological recording of simple muscle contractions, electromyographs, and reflex arcs; bone surface features; and cat or sheep dissection of muscles, the brain, and the eye. Three laboratory hours per week. Corerequisite: BIO-308. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-338/348, BIO-322/342.


BIO-346: Principles of Ecology Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Laboratory studies of ecosystems to supplement lecture material presented in BIO-326 and illustrate some techniques involved in current ecological studies.  Laboratory exercises will combine studies of plant, animal, and environmental interactions with experimental manipulations of selected ecosystems.  Three laboratory or field trip hours per week. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, (MAT-181 or MAT-191). Corequisite BIO-326.


BIO-345: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab (2 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A vertebrate dissection course.  A comparative systems approach is used in the detailed dissection of the lamprey, dogfish shark, mudpuppy, and cat.  The course also includes the microscopic and gross examination of hemichordates and protochordates.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-222, BIO-242. Corequisite: BIO-321.


BIO-344: Microbiology Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

A series of laboratory exercises chosen to acquaint students with procedures used in studying bacteria, including aseptic technique, culturing methods and staining techniques.  Students isolate strains from natural habitats and also carry out exercises associated with food and medical microbiology.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-251, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142. Corequisite BIO-334.


BIO-343: Vertebrate Physiology Lab (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Includes experimentation in cellular physiology, blood analysis and circulation, respiration, excretion, and neuromuscular function.  Some dissection of preserved and fresh animal organs is required as necessary to understand organ functions.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142. Corequisite: BIO-323.


BIO-342: Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab (1 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Students examine the structures of the human body by use of models, charts, and dissection of preserved and fresh animal organs.  Also, experiments are used to demonstrate functional aspects of the major organ systems.  Three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-322. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-338/348, BIO-322/342.


BIO-339: Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3 cr.) Session(s): Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

A lecture course on the functional anatomy of the endocrine system, reproductive system, digestive system, respiratory system, excretory system, and circulatory system. The perspective of the course is on the relationship between structure and function, adaptation through evolution, and homeostasis. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: BIO-338, BIO-348. Corequisite: BIO-349


BIO-338: Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

A lecture course on the functional anatomy of human cells and tissues, organization of the body, the integument, the skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sensory structures. The perspective of the course is on the relationship between structure and function, adaptation through evolution, and homeostasis. Three lectures per week. Corequisites: BIO-348. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-338/348 or BIO-322/342.


BIO-334: Microbiology ( cr.) Session(s): Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

A course designed to provide a general understanding of the structure and function of bacterial cell types along with the application of bacteriology to certain medical, food, environmental and industrial processes.  Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-251, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142. Corequisite: BIO-344.


BIO-326: Principles of Ecology (3 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A study of the interactions between plants and animals and their environments.  The effects of environmental factors on living systems are considered at the individual, population, and community levels.  Three lectures per week. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, (MAT-181 or MAT-191).  Corequisite BIO-346.


BIO-323: Vertebrate Physiology (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A comprehensive study of the principal processes involved in vertebrate cells, tissues, and organ systems, including circulation, respiration, excretion, acid-base and fluid balances, digestion, reproduction, and muscle-nerve coordination and integration.  Anatomy is studied as necessary to understand the functions of the different systems.  Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142. Corequisite: BIO-343. 


BIO -322: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Study of the structure and function of the major tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human body.  Three lectures per week. Corequisite course: BIO-342. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-338/348, BIO-322/342.


BIO-321: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (2 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A course in the comparative morphology of protochordates and vertebrates.  The sequence of study includes protochordate origin, vertebrate origin, vertebrate diversity, early embryology, and the comparative morphology of vertebrate organ systems.  The evolutionary and developmental history of vertebrates will be of major importance. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-222, BIO-242. Corequisite: BIO-345.


BIO-314: Medical Parasitology (4 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A combined lecture-laboratory course.  This course is a comprehensive investigation of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites with special emphasis to those of medical and veterinary importance.  The techniques of parasitology are covered including egg sedimentation, life cycle studies, animal necropsy, and the use of taxonomic keys. Students are given a comprehensive set of prepared slides for detailed study. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-222, BIO-242.


BIO-311: Histology (4 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A combined lecture-laboratory course.  The microanatomy of mammalian tissues and organs at both the light and electron microscope level are surveyed.  Histology by its nature is highly visual, therefore, lecture and laboratory work will be integrated into a unified format. Students are introduced to the basics of microscopy and microtechnique, and are responsible for tissue and organ recognition and critical interpretation. Students are given a comprehensive set of prepared slides for detailed study. Three lecture-laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-222, BIO-242.


BIO-305: Immunology (3 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course is designed to give students exposure to the fundamental concepts of human immunology. Course topics include the history of the discipline, innate and adaptive immunity, antigen recognition, B-cell and T-cell maturation and selection, the complement cascade response and control and manipulation of the immune system. Special topics on human immune diseases, including autoimmunity and immunodeficiency, will be discussed.  Additionally, the course will explore practical applications of immunology in laboratory, diagnostic and public health settings. Prerequisites: BIO 110/151, BIO 251, CHE 111/141, CHE 112/142


BIO-299: Research Development (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A research development and seminar course in which freshman and sophomore level students will be introduced to processes and mechanisms for conducting original laboratory, field, or library based research.  Students are required to present their findings orally and in written form.  May be repeated for credit for a maximum of four semester hours. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.


BIO-265: Environmental Science Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Students will apply biological, chemical, and geological techniques to investigate environmental processes and how these processes are impacted by humans.  Class time will be spent in the laboratory and field. One three-hour lab meeting per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 225


BIO-260: Introduction to Pharmacology (3 cr.) Session(s): Summer | Course Offered Every Year

A course presenting many of the central principles of pharmacology and the mechanisms of drug action on biological systems.  Areas of study include drug development, dose-response relationships, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics. Prerequisites BIO 110/151, CHE 111/141


BIO-258: Techniques in Tissue Culture (1 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year, Even-Numbered Years Only

A presentation of current methods in plant tissue culture.  Discussion and research experiments to develop understanding and expertise in such areas as:  sterile technique, plant propagation, nutritional effects, isolation and fusion of protoplasts, and other current plant tissue culture techniques.  Three practicum hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.


BIO-256: Techniques in Microscopy (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

The microscope and microscopy [techniques] are central to the development and practice of modern biology.  This course provides a historical outline of microscopy and a review of its modern techniques.  Topics included are phase-contrast, interference, fluorescence, confocal, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. One practicum hour per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.


BIO-254: Evolution of Biological Systems (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of the emergence and history of life on earth.  Emphasis is put on the mechanisms that result in evolutionary change at the cellular, population, and ecosystem level.  Areas covered include genetics, population ecology, speciation, and extinction. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.


BIO-251: Cell Biology (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered

The fundamental unit of life is the cell; therefore, cell biology forms the base upon which all modern biology and medicine is built. This course provides advanced study of microscopy and associated techniques such as freeze-fracture, fractionation, centrifugation, immunofluorescense, and cell fusion.  Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells will be covered but the course will emphasize eukaryotic cells. Topics covered will include:  cell chemistry, bioenergetics, enzymes, membranes, transport across membranes, endomembrane system, cell junctions, respiration, photosynthesis, cell cycle, cell division, information flow, gene regulation and expression, cytoskeleton, motility, contractility, signal transduction, cellular aspects of the immune response, and the cellular aspects of cancer. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141.


BIO-242: Animal Biology Laboratory (2 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Laboratory studies include specific reference to classification, structure, function, ecology and phylogeny of the major animalians.  Special emphasis is placed on the observation of living animals.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151.  Corequisite: BIO-222.


BIO-241: Plant Biology Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Laboratory study of plants to illustrate and supplement lecture material presented in BIO-211. Laboratory exercises will deal with life cycles and morphology of the major groups of the plant kingdom, anatomy and morphology of higher plants, and experiments in plant physiology.  Three laboratory or field trip hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151. Corequisite: BIO-211.


BIO-225: Environmental Science (3 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Application of scientific principles to the study, conservation and management of the environment with emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving used to study this broad field. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-265.


BIO-222: Animal Biology (2 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A comparative phylogenetic study of protozoans and animalians.  For each taxon structural and functional consideration will be given to the systems of maintenance, activity, and continuity. The course will also emphasize the ecology, behavior, and evolution of each group. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151.  Corequisite: BIO-242.  Three lecture hours per week.


BIO-211: Plant Biology (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, systematics, and ecology of land plants as well as fungi and algae. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151. Corequisite: BIO-241.


BIO -205: Biology and Society (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Recent advances in biology and medicine are creating many new and complex social issues and conflicts.  Developing a community of concerned responsibility to resolve these issues requires an understanding of the underlying biological principles involved and of the various potential solutions.  Through a series of selected topics Biology and Society will present the pertinent basic biological concepts and will foster discussion of values and issues involved in making personal decisions about each topic. Prerequisite: any lab science course.


BIO-204: Women in Science (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A course that delves into the role of women in science throughout history. Students will examine relationships of women to society in general and to science as it evolved through changing societies. The lives of an assortment of women who contributed to scientific advance will be examined. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: any laboratory science.


BIO-202: Pathways to Careers in Healthcare (1 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course introduces students to concepts of inter-professional education as it is being practiced in the field of healthcare.  Students will be guided through reflection on ethical and practical issues of a career in the healthcare field.  Students will review requirements and application processes for a variety of careers including medical, dental, physician assistant, veterinary, as well as the many allied health programs. Additional topics covered include study of the variety of healthcare professions, avenues of application, professionalism, personal statements, and developing an academic plan.  This is a seminar course with speaker and discussion format.


BIO -201: Pathways to Careers in Life Sciences (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

The course will provide exposure to professions related to the life sciences and environmental sustainability.  Using student identified Strengths from StrengthsQuest, students will develop the professional skill sets to start a career path in various life science and sustainability fields.  Employment opportunities at all levels (technician, field specialist, human resources, sales, marketing, education, writing, advocacy, management, coordinator, etc.) in nonprofit, government, academic, and private sector industries will be discussed.  


BIO -200: Medical Terminology (3 cr.) Session(s): Summer | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to terminology used in the health professions. This is an on-line, self-paced course covering root words, suffixes, and prefixes commonly used in healthcare professional settings. Students will be guided through development of a medical vocabulary and use of this knowledge to analyze primary literature in the medical field and presentation of medical information.


BIO -151: Principles of Biology Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

An introductory laboratory designed for students with interest in pursuing a major in science. Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the principles considered in BIO-110. Topics include cellular structure, respiration, photosynthesis, DNA structure and function, cellular and organismal reproduction, and genetics. Meets two hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-110. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-105/145 or BIO 110/151.


BIO-145: Modern Biological Concepts Laboratory (1 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

An introductory laboratory designed for non-science majors. Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the principles considered in BIO-105. Topics include cellular structure, respiration and photosynthesis, ecological, relationships, DNA structure and function, cellular reproduction, genetics, and evolution. Meets two hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-105. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-105/145 or BIO-110/151.


BIO-110: Principles of Biology (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

An introductory biology course designed for students with interest in pursuing a major in science. This course provides a rigorous scientific basis for the central concepts of biology and prepares students with a foundation for further study. Areas of study include biochemical aspects of cells, eukaryotic cellular structure, principles of cellular reproduction, mechanisms of inheritance, and processes of energy production and utilization. Three lecture hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-151. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-105/145 or BIO-110/151.


BIO-105: Modern Biological Concepts (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to biological concepts designed for non-science majors. This course presents the central principles of biological theory: Cell structure and metabolisms, reproduction, genetics, biodiversity, ecology and evolution in relation to current issues. The course provides students with an understanding of the living world through the process of science. Three lecture hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-145. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: BIO 105/145 or BIO 110/151.


PHS-480: Public Health Internship (3 cr.) Session(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

The internship is a culminating experience for the Public Health major. Public Health majors will work with community partners to engage in volunteer experiences that assist the community partner and provide students with exposure to issues in public health practice. Students will apply concepts learned in core courses to a project that will serve the community partner and demonstrate the student's understanding of the field of Public Health. Open to Public Health majors and minors only. Prerequisites: PHS-101, PHS-301, PHS-302.


PHS-302: Epidemiology (3 cr.) Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Epidemiology provides students with a quantitative methodology for assessment of risk in diverse populations. Relationships of disease and risk of disease in diverse populations is discussed with applications to case studies. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151 and PHS-101.


PHS-301: Biostatistics (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course is an introductory course in biostatistics, with a strong emphasis on statistical applications, in public health and environmental research. This course will provide students with statistical tools for the analysis and presentation of data, and will stress interpretation of statistical results from health science literature. Course topics will include: sampling and study design, graphical presentation of data, simple hypothesis testing, repeated
measures analysis, and regression modeling. Students will develop analytical computing and data presentation skills using the statistical package 'R'. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151 and MAT-175 or MAT-248.


PHS-101: Introduction to Public Health (3 cr.) Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This is an introduction to the field of public health that educates students in the interdisciplinary field of public health. Students are introduced to concepts of epidemiology, public health tools of informatics and policy, social and behavioral aspects of public health, environmental and social determinants of morbidity and morality, healthcare and political systems, and health disparities. Through the use of case studies of current public health issues, students will examine scientific aspects of disease, effects of population behaviors, socioeconomic and cultural influences, health education, health policy and management on the overall health of diverse populations. 



Curriculum requirements and course descriptions are subject to changes with each catalogue.



Request Information Classroom to Career

This video is about the STEM programs at Meredith College.

Learn more about the STEM programs at Meredith College.

STEM at Meredith College

Learn more about the STEM programs at Meredith College.


Contact Information
Francie Cuffney
Head, Dept. of Biological Sciences
103 Science/Mathematics Bldg.
(919) 760-2879
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)